Venom Life-Size Bust by Sideshow Collectibles

The Venom Life-Size Bust created by Sideshow Collectibles measures 27.5” tall, bringing Eddie Brock and his symbiote straight from the Marvel universe.

“Venom’s massive maw features jagged fangs and his iconic, terrifying tongue on full display. Clear resin drool glistens from his teeth and tongue, giving the Venom Life-Size Bust an added degree of disgusting realism!

The fibreglass Venom Life-Size Bust has been sculpted with painstaking detail to capture his monstrous presence. His muscular shoulders are detailed with dynamic black symbiote textures, providing a stark contrast to his glossy white eyes and the raised spider-symbols on his chest and back. A sleek, simple black base puts the focus on Venom’s terrifying silhouette, while complimenting the other Marvel Life-Size collectibles from Sideshow.”

Artists: Ryan Peterson (Design & Sculpt), Matt Molen (Design), Richard Luong (Design), Simon Garcia (Mold & Cast), Chadwick Andersen (Mold & Cast), Anthony Mestas (Paint), Steve Riojas (Paint), Casey Love (Paint)

Expected to Ship: June 2019 – August 2019

Product Size: 27.5″ H (698.5mm) x 16.5″ W (419.1mm) x 15″ L (381mm)

Price: $1,195

Sideshow Collectibles

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The Day Mars Invaded Earth – USA, 1963

The Day Mars Invaded Earth – aka Spaceraid 63 – is a 1963 American science fiction feature film produced and directed by Maury Dexter (House of the Damned), The movie stars Kent Taylor, Marie Windsor, and William Mims. It was released by Twentieth Century Fox.

 

Plot:

NASA successfully lands a robotic surveyor on Mars. However, after just a few minutes, the rover is completely destroyed by what appears to be a high energy surge. Back at mission control, Dr. Dave Fielding (Kent Taylor), in charge of the project, suddenly feels oddly disconnected and not himself; he shakes it off and then goes to face the crowd of expectant reporters. Right after he leaves, his exact body double is sitting at his desk.

Dave then leaves for a long-overdue vacation and flies to California to be with his family; they are now staying in the guest house of a lavish mansion belonging to his wife’s family. At first, the tensions between Dave and his wife Claire make it less obvious that they are seeing their body doubles walking around the estate. However, as things turn strange, the whole family suspects something is wrong, very wrong…

Reviews:

” …one of Lippert’s least interesting sci-fi melodramas, despite two startlingly good moments. The 69-minute film plays like a protracted, lesser episode of Twilight Zone, and almost certainly was built around the availability of Doheny Mansion (aka Greystone Mansion), a Beverly Hills landmark.” Stuart Galbraith IV, DVD Talk

” …so much time in the movie is spent with people silently wandering around the estate, that I wonder if the movie was actually a real estate film; it’s a beautiful place, and if I only had the money…, but a real estate sales pitch doesn’t build suspense, a commodity this movie needs badly.” Dave Sindelar, Fantastic Movie Musings and Ramblings

“The middle of the film develops an eerie atmosphere with faces blurring out; the unsettling quietude of the estate gardens in their geometrically laid-out perfection and the wife being pursued through them by an eerie noise; the scenes with the doppelgangers trying to kill their owners. The end revelation of what is going on, which prefigures Solaris (1972), is slightly underdeveloped, although there is an effective twist ending.” Richard Scheib, Moria

“Surprisingly grim ending is weakened by a mediocre cast and script.” TV Guide

“Unpretentious programmer with echoes of Invasion of the Body Snatchers.” Alan Frank, The Science Fiction and Fantasy Film Handbook, Batsford, 1982

“Spooky, well-constructed tale of Martian menace, deftly blending uncanny suspense and human interest.” Daily Cinema

“This pallid, pint-sized exercise starts out with a scientist and his little family vacationing on a huge California estate after he has supervised a rocket landing on Mars. At least, we’re told he has. Then the family begins seeing spots and double images, to spook music. This took 40 minutes, before one viewer came back to earth, retreating…” Howard Thompson, The New York Times

Cast and characters:

  • Kent Taylor … Dr. David Fielding
  • Marie Windsor … Claire Fielding
  • William Mims … Dr. Web Spencer
  • Betty Beall … Judi Fielding
  • Lowell Brown … Frank Hazard
  • Gregg Shank … Rocky Fielding
  • Henrietta Moore … Mrs. Moore
  • Troy Melton … Police Officer
  • George Riley … Cab Driver

Filming locations:

Filmed at Greystone Mansion, in Beverly Hills, California, seen in many films, including House of the DamnedPicture Mommy DeadPhantom of the Paradise, EraserheadFlowers in the AtticDeath Becomes HerGhostbusters II and The Witches of Eastwick.

Technical credits:

70 minutes | CinemaScope

Trivia:

Maury Dexter later said the film’s title came from Associated Producers’ Robert L. Lippert and was meant to evoke memories of Fox’s 1951 classic The Day the Earth Stood Still.

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Scanners II: The New Order – Canada, 1991

Scanners II: The New Order is a 1991 Canadian science fiction horror feature film directed by Christian Duguay (Screamers; Scanners III: The Takeover) from a screenplay by B.J. Nelson, based on David Cronenberg’s Scanners characters. The Malofilm production stars David Hewlett, Deborah Raffin, Raoul Trujillo, and Yvan Ponton.

Plot:

David Kellum (David Hewlett), a young veterinarian intern, discovers that he has mental abilities to read and control minds of others. When he moves to the city to continue his studies, he finds difficulty in controlling himself: the congestion of many minds and the ability to hear voices overwhelm him.

During an armed robbery of a store David kills the gunman with his mind. Police Commander John Forrester watches the store’s security tape. He tells David that he knows what he is: a Scanner. And, there are others like him around the world. He enlists David’s help in tracking down elusive criminals…

Review:

Scanners II presents a neat twist on the original format, having the dysfunctional scanners being exploited by a right-wing police chief, who uses them to dish out vigilante justice. There are some nice touches dealing with the addictive nature of the drugs used to control the telepaths too, and some good gore set-pieces. The lead performances are passable – certainly no worse than Stephen Lack’s in the first film – and it’s likely that if you hadn’t seen David Cronenberg’s movie, you might well find this an impressively original movie.

As well as obviously aping the first film’s broad story, Scanners II also throws in another exploding head, taking a dramatic images from the original film and turning it into a thematic point – the implication being that you can’t have a Scanners film without an exploding head.

Obviously made with one eye on the prospect of further sequels, French director Christian Duguay – making his feature film debut -handles the material well, and although critics were generally dismissive, the target audience were generally happy with it in its video heyday, making a third instalment inevitable.

David Flint, HORRORPEDIA

Other reviews:

“Some surprising familial links are made to the first film, but Scanners II plays things too safe. David has a girlfriend and loving parents. Raoul Trujillo plays Drak as more goofy than menacing. The plot flirts far too lightly with the alarming ethical issues of the Morse Neurological Research Institute deploying the EPH-2 drug to revert Scanners to a near comatose state.” Mat Bradley-Tschirgi, Battleship Pretension

“Hewlett is an affable enough type, he makes a good hero. His teaming up with Raffin as Vale works and ties into the original continuity of the first film in an appropriate enough manner. Ponton is fun as Forrester, watching him attempt to basically climb to power is enjoyable while Butler makes for a fine scientist. The movie is well shot, making good use of its Montreal locations…” Ian Jane, DVD Talk

“All the ideas of the original are translated into absurdly physical terms. The original’s head exploding trick was a show-capping novelty but here the effect is overused to the point of tedium – now heads explode every time scanners battle. The sequel is a film devoid of any intellectual content…” Richard Scheib, Moria

“Director Christian Duguay isn’t Cronenberg and in all fairness he doesn’t try to be either. He’s more of an action director and Scanners II moves at a pace more suited to something like The Hidden. The political machinations of Forrester are interesting to watch but the real fun is in the sequences like the opening in the video arcade.” Horace Cordier, Rock! Shock! Pop!

“The plot suggests a computer game called ‘RoboCop meets the Scanners’, while Duguay’s visual style consists entirely of pop promo clichés […] The cast is anonymous, the plot confused and sluggish; only Michael Smithson’s cheap, inventive special effects warrant attention.” Nigel Floyd, Time Out

” …there’s just no drive or urgency to the proceedings. There’s no fire in the flick’s belly. On top of that, it bogs way the f*ck down once Hewlett touches base with his sister. Oh, and if you take a shot of your favorite alcohol every time a character says “The New Order”, your head might explode.” Mitch Lovell, The Video Vacuum

Cast and characters:

  • David Hewlett … David Kellum
  • Deborah Raffin … Julie Vale
  • Yvan Ponton … Commander John Forrester
  • Isabelle Meijias … Alice Leonardo
  • Raoul Trujillo … Peter Drak
  • Tom Butler … Doctor Morse
  • Vlasta Vrána … Lt. Guy Gelson
  • Dorothée Berryman … Mayor Lanzoni
  • Murray Westgate … George Keullum
  • Doris Petrie … Susan Kellum
  • Emily Eby … Reporter
  • Jason Cavalier … Convenience Store Thug

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Bird Box – USA, 2018

‘Never lose sight of survival’

Bird Box is a 2018 American post-apocalyptic horror feature film directed by Susanne Bier from a screenplay by Eric Heisserer (Lights Out; The Thing [2011]; Final Destination 5), based on the 2014 novel of the same name by Josh Malerman.

The movie stars Sandra Bullock, Sarah Paulson, Trevante Rhodes, Jacki Weaver, Rosa Salazar, Danielle Macdonald, Lil Rel Howery, Tom Hollander, Machine Gun Kelly, BD Wong and John Malkovich.

Malorie (Sandra Bullock), a mother of two, must face an “entity that takes on the form of your worst fears” that has decimated much of the world’s population. In order to survive, Mamorie flees with her two children and has to travel down a river, and the trio must do it all while blindfolded…

The world premiere of Bird Box will be at AFI Fest on November 12, 2018. The film is scheduled to be released on December 21, 2018 by Netflix.

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Infested – USA, 2002

Infested is a 2002 American science fiction horror feature film written and directed by Josh Olson (writer of animated Batman: Gotham Knight and David Cronenberg’s A History of Violence). The movie stars Zach Galligan, Lisa Ann Hadley, Daniel Jenkins and Amy Jo Johnson.

After the funeral of an old friend, a group of New York yuppies gather upstate for a weekend of emotional reflection. However, it all starts to go horribly wrong when they are attacked by an infestation of mutant flies…

Reviews:

” …a story about (magic?) flies, zombies, a thirty something reunion, eighties tunes and some of the most stupid situations ever in a horror flick. The overriding problem is that flies are not scary. There is nothing remotely scary about a fly. Even mass quantities of them don’t bring fear.” Dr. Gore’s Movie Reviews

“Gorehounds will find one or two worthwhile moments (an extended sequence involving a bathroom and someone’s horrifically injured leg is suitably goopy) amidst the tiresome antics, but if you’re enough of a horror freak to give this one a spin – odds are you’ll lose all patience with Infested long before the minute moments of interest pop onto the screen.” Scott Weinberg, e-FilmCritic

“This thing is a steaming pile filled with the worst CG bugs ever and lacks any originality. There’s one pretty lackluster gore effect involving a leg and a pair of nail clippers. You want all of the characters to die after the first five minutes of them being introduced.” One Man’s Garbage

“This entire thing is pretty silly and gets outright ridiculous in the finale; but it still manages to be a mildly amusing timewaster due to its unserious tone and some gooey gore effects (like a pleasing moment where one of the possessed friends gets a crowbar to the head) – just don’t expect much sense.” The Video Graveyard

“The acting, dialog, plot development, (most of the) special effects and anything that must be good to make a half-way professional film are for the most part missing or fifth-rate, and therein lies the joy of the film. Don’t watch Infested expecting quality, watch it for the piece of shit it is and you just might find that it is pretty enjoyable…” A Wasted Life

Cast and characters:

  • Zach Galligan … Warren – American Bigfoot; The Chair; Hatchet III; Legion of the DeadWaxworkGremlins and Gremlins 2; et al
  • Lisa Ann Hadley … Ellen
  • Daniel Jenkins … Steven
  • Amy Jo Johnson … Jesse
  • Nahanni Johnstone … Mindy
  • Robert Duncan McNeill … Eric
  • Jack Mulcahy … Bob
  • David Packer … Elliot
  • Camilla Overbye Roos … Robin
  • Tuc Watkins … Carl
  • Mark Margolis … Father Morning

 

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I Married a Monster from Outer Space – USA, 1958

I Married a Monster from Outer Space is a 1958 science fiction horror feature film, produced and directed by Gene Fowler Jr. (The Astral FactorI Was a Teenage Werewolf) from a screenplay by Louis Vittes (The Eyes of Annie Jones; Monster from Green Hell). The Paramount movie stars Tom Tryon, Gloria Talbott, Chuck Wassil and Maxie Rosenbloom.

Newly-married Marge Farrell who finds her husband Bill strangely transformed soon after her marriage: He is losing his affection for his wife and other living beings and drops various earlier habits. Soon she finds out that Bill is not the only man in town changing into a completely different person.

Young newlywed Marge Farrell notices her new husband Bill is acting strangely. He doesn’t show any affection towards her or anything else, including his pet dogs, which he used to love. Marge is also concerned that she cannot seem to get pregnant.

She then notices that other husbands in her social circle are all acting the same way. One night she follows Bill while he goes for a walk. She discovers that he is not the man she knew but an alien impostor: An extraterrestrial life-form leaves his body and enters a hidden spaceship…

Review:

I imagine that most people’s natural instinct with a film like this is to make fun of the title and just go on from there but actually, I Married a Monster from Outer Space is an intelligent and well-made sci-fi movie. Gloria Talbott does a great job in the lead role and Tom Tryon’s rather stiff screen presence is perfectly suited for the role of Alien-Bill. Gene Fowler, Jr. directs the film as if it were a film noir where the usual gangsters and bank robbers have been replaced by humanoid aliens who don’t like dogs.

Since this movie is from 1958, there’s all sorts of subtext creeping around. The most obvious, of course, is that America is being invaded from within. You don’t think your husband could be an alien? Well, Alger Hiss’s mother probably didn’t think her son was a communist spy! You think it’s a silly idea that normal seeming humans would be working to conquer the world? Have you not heard of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg? When Bill and the other men turn cold and impersonal, it’s easy to see that they’ve embraced an ideology opposed to individual freedom and we all know what that means.

However, for me, this film works because it strikes at a very primal fear. How well do you really know the people who you love? Is he always going to be as perfect as he seems when you first start going out or is he going to totally change once he’s sure that you’re not going to leave him? Like many women who have tried to escape from abusive boyfriends and spouses, Marge discovers that no one believes her. She lives in a world controlled by men and all of the men have been taken over by the same thing that’s taken over Bill. Even if you’ve never married a monster from outer space, you know what Marge is going through.

So, don’t dismiss this film because of the melodramatic title. I Married a Monster from Outer Space is an intelligent sci-fi horror film, one that’s still very relevant today.

Lisa Marie Bowman, HORRORPEDIA – guest reviewer via Through the Shattered Lens

Other reviews:

” …Talbott is genuinely appealing in these sorts of films, while Tyron is as wooden as his alien persona should be. The intergalactic creatures are pretty frightening, with extended arms, fish-like claws and mutated faces that sport trunk-like breathing apparatuses–some if which are ripped open by angry German Shepherds, allowing the ooze to flow in some of the more creepier scenes.” George R. Reis, DVD Drive-In

“Political implications, as well as feminist ones, can be read into the film, particularly as the title is similar to the earlier I Married a Communist, but the film succeeds purely on the level of a creepy sf/horror film with the emphasis on horror rather than sf.” John Brosnan, Future Tense: The Cinema of Science Fiction, St. Martin’s Press, 1978

“This generally well-acted and staged Science Fiction thriller, though novelettish in its personal story, has an intriguing situation and some effective, if rather sparse, trick camerawork.” Monthly Film Bulletin, 1958

“One of the most enjoyable titles in the genre. The film itself is well acted and directed, although the monster itself is more risible than credible.” Alan Frank, The Science Fiction and Fantasy Film Handbook, Batsford, 1982

“Fowler’s direction, while sometimes slow, latches onto mounting suspense as action moves to climax. He gets the benefit of outstanding special photographic effects from John P. Fulton, which aid in maintaining interest.” Variety, 1958

Cast and characters:

  • Tom Tryon … Bill Farrell
  • Gloria Talbott … Marge Bradley Farrell – The Daughter of Dr. Jekyll
  • Peter Baldwin … Officer Frank Swanson
  • Robert Ivers … Harry Phillips
  • Chuck Wassil … Ted Hanks
  • Ty Hardin [credited as Ty Hungerford] … Mac Brody
  • Ken Lynch … Dr. Wayne
  • John Eldredge … Police Captain H.B. Collins
  • Alan Dexter … Sam Benson
  • James Anderson … Weldon
  • Jean Carson … Helen Alexander Benson
  • Jack Orrison … Officer Schultz
  • Steve London … Charles Mason
  • Max “Slapsie Maxie” Rosenbloom … Max Grady, bartender
  • Scherry Staiger … Blond in Bar

Production and release:

Principal photography for I Married a Monster from Outer Space began on April 21 and ended in early May 1958. The reported budget was $125,000.

On September 10, 1958, the film premiered in Los Angeles, followed by its US and Canadian theatrical release in October by Paramount as a double feature with The Blob.

In 2004 Paramount released a DVD of the film which, unlike the open matte, full frame (1.33:1) format of the 1998 VHS release, cropped the original 1:85:1 image to the modern 16:9 (1.78:1) TV aspect ratio. On September 2013, the film was released on DVD as part of the Warner Bros Archive Collection.

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More 1950s sci-fi and horror

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Darken – Canada, 2017

‘Another world awaits’

Darken is a 2017 Canadian science fiction horror feature film directed by Audrey Cummings (She Never Died; Tormented) from a screenplay by RJ Lackie. It was produced by Shaftesbury Films’ Smokebomb Entertainment.

The movie stars Bea Santos, Oluniké Adeliyi, Christine Horne, Paul Amos, and Ari Millen. Natasha Negovanlis makes a cameo appearance.

In 2018, an eleven-part limited digital series (acting as a prequel to the film), called Darken: Before the Dark was released on KindaTV.

After a young woman – Eve (Bea Santos) – is accosted by a dying warrior in the middle of the street, a bizarre incantation propels her into the realm of Darken – a violent prison-like world of labyrinthine rooms, interconnected with no apparent rhyme or reason and no way of escape.

As Eve fights for survival within this brutal place, she finds allies who are rebelling against the rule of a self-appointed religious despot who demands allegiance to an all-powerful god called “Mother Darken.” Eve and her allies must fight with everything they have if they are to have any hope of surviving the horrors Darken has in store for them…

Reviews:

“With a story penetrated by plot holes, slightly substandard cinematography, as well as the majority of the portrayals of the film’s rather insipid and inconsistent characters, Darken could only be described as “just missing the mark.” Darkenappeared to be a more ambitious project than what was capably executable. ” Misty Wallace, Cryptic Rock

“As long as you accept the presentation at face value, Darken’s ambitious ideas retain their entertainment weight. It’s a toss up if you’ll want a return ticket to this weird world. But one time through its portal is worth the trip.” Ian Sedensky, Culture Crypt

“The plot itself is fairly different with the twists, turns and places it goes. While some of its ideas could certainly use fleshing out it’s still unusual and interesting enough to hold your interest and builds to a finish that for once deserves its open ending.” Jim Morazzini, Voices from the Balcony

“Screenwriter RJ Lackie must’ve missed the tutorial on how to elaborate on ordinary details in special ways.  His derivative script hardly provides any decent characterization – making the film’s exposition hard for viewers to comprehend or care for – and he’s also written roles to match basic cutouts found in generic action thrillers.” Addison Wylie, Wylie Writes

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Shocking Dark – Italy, 1989

Shocking Dark is a 1989 Italian science-fiction film directed by Bruno Mattei (Snuff Trap; Rats: Night of Terror; The Other Hell; et al)from a screenplay by Claudio Fragasso (Troll 2). Produced by Franco Gaudenzi, the movie stars Christopher Ahrens, Haven Tyler, and Geretta Geretta.

It has also been released as Terminator IITerminator 2Aliens 2Aliennators, and Contaminator.

Although the film was promoted as an offshoot of James Cameron’s The Terminator, it is actually mostly a rip-off of Aliens, also directed by Cameron.

Venice, Italy: A team of Mega Force marines, a tough female civilian and an orphaned girl battle monsters beneath the Venice canals while being chased by an indestructible killer cyborg…

Reviews:

Shocking Dark doesn’t have much of a plot, at least not of the coherent variety, and it rips off movies that are much better. It also features lots and lots of shouting and some of the most hysterical line readings in the history of cinema. And there’s plenty of cheap, fun gore — it is a Bruno Mattei film after all.” Chris Coffel, Bloody Disgusting

Shocking Dark is just bat guano crazy a lot of the time, bolstered by hyperbolic line readings, lots of screaming, and a production design that is equal parts Ed Wood and not quite ready for prime time Star Trek: The Original Series.” Jeffrey Kauffman, Blu-ray.com

“Basically this is just an hour and a half of non-acting entities running around darkened corridors blowing mutants away with pump action shotguns and screaming incessantly […] Aliens, Terminators, shotguns, gore, absurdness and Bruno Mattei all together in one low budget shlockfest of awesome.” Cool Target

Shocking Dark’s biggest asset is its blatant plagiarism; if it didn’t hew so close to Cameron’s world it would be just another cheap knock off released at a time when the cinematic universe was littered with them. The film’s audacity sets it apart and gives it a sheen that others simply don’t have; the viewer has no choice but to compare, and the end result is a compulsion to praise it rather than admonish.” Scott Drebit, Daily Dead

“Don’t expect to see anything but men in gooey rubber suits menacing the cast, but there’s a charm to the effort that made me love these ugly suckers. Mattei doesn’t hold them back for the finale, either; these things are the xenomorphs of the film and they are shown often and, perhaps unwisely, in good lighting.” Anthony Arrigo, Dread Central

” …one must admire a movie which has the audacity to name a character “Samuel Fuller”. On the other hand, there’s some racist statements here which probably wouldn’t fly today. From the costumes to the locations to the acting to the dialogue, everything here is Grade-Z, but if you think that you’ve seen the bottom of the Italian barrel, prepare to be shocked.” Mike Long, DVD Sleuth

” …one hell of an entertaining fright flick in it’s own right, due mainly from a game performance from the legendary Geretta Geretta, fun creature suits, amazingly cheesy (yet amazingly awesome) costuming… the whole thing plays out like a bizarre, alternate reality…” Horror Fuel

Buy Blu-ray: Amazon.com

“Anyone familiar with Mattei and company should have a basic idea of what to expect here: stilted acting, nutty plot twists, lots of padding with actors roaming dark sets, and screaming. Lots and lots of screaming. The rubbery, Sid and Marty Krofft-style monsters are actually fun when they pop up and show more variety than you’d expect, and it actually becomes a fun game trying to catch every single lift from other movies…” Nathaniel Thompson, Mondo Digital

Cast and characters:

  • Christopher Ahrens [as Cristofer Ahrens] … Samuel Fuller
  • Haven Tyler [as Geretta Giancarlo Field] … Dr. Sara Drumbull
  • Geretta Geretta … Koster – Demons
  • Fausto Lombardi [as Tony Lombardo]… Lieutentant Franzini
  • Mark Steinborn … Captain Dalton Bond
  • Dominica Coulson … Samantha Raphelson
  • Clive Riche [as Clive Ricke] … Drake
  • Paul Norman Allen … Kowalsky
  • Cortland Reilly … Caine
  • Richard Ross … Price
  • Bruce McFarland … Colonel Parson
  • Richard Berkeley [as Richard Bercheley] … First Scientist
  • John Champion … Second Scientist
  • Massimo Vanni [as Alex McBride]… First Soldier
  • Elain Richmond … Speaker

Release:

Until 2018, the film had never been released on video in the United States for legal reasons. However, it was been released on VHS in countries such as Japan, Brazil and Italy itself.

Severin Films released the film on Blu-ray on May 29, 2018.

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Doctor Jekyll and the Werewolf – Spain, 1971

‘Spine chilling horror!!’

Doctor Jekyll and the Wolfman is a 1971 Spanish directed by León Klimovsky (The Vampires’ Night Orgy; Vengeance of the Zombies; The Dracula Saga; et al) from a screenplay by Jacinto Molina (aka Paul Naschy). The latter stars, alongside Shirley Corrigan, Jack Taylor and Mirta Miller.

Newlyweds Imre (Jose Marco) and Justine (Shirley Corrigan) are visiting Transylvania for their honeymoon when they are attacked by bandits. Imre is killed but Justine is rescued by Polish nobleman Waldemar Daninsky (Paul Naschy), who is also a werewolf. The local villagers launch an attack on Daninsky’s castle, so he and Justine flee to London.

Besotted with Daninsky, yet aware of his tragic lycanthropic condition, Justine asks her friend Dr. Henry Jekyll (Jack Taylor) if he can help. Jekyll injects Daninsky with his grandfather’s potion to try and cure him…

Reviews: 

“Some of the action scenes seem slow and a bit sloppy, but the plethora of horror elements and gore (Daninsky even pulls chunks of flesh out of one victim) override the shortcomings […] Dr. Jekyll and the Wolfman (1972) is well worth your investment; and for Naschy fans, this tour de force of werewolfery and Hyde’s hedonistic sadist is a howlingly good time.” Brian Bankston, Cool Ass Cinema

“Klimovsky treats the rather campy premise with considerable style, with the action moving from the traditional horror movie motifs of the old country (the angry villagers, local superstitions, freakish looking scavengers) to modern London where the scenic images include a rather seedy early 1970s Soho district. Naschy acts and looks as great as ever as the werewolf, but his Mr. Hyde, well he’s a pisser.” George R. Reis, DVD Drive-In

“Naschy is having so much fun and projects such infectious enthusiasm that it is simply impossible to be overly critical of his endeavours here. And Naschy is actually very effective in parts, particularly when he transforms into the heinous Mr Hyde. And, as the werewolf, he pulls off a good crowd scene in a groovy night-club…” Lee Brougton, DVD Savant

” …there are moments of acknowledgeable proficiency as displayed periodically by director Klimovsky in other films: the awakening of Justine in the centuries old castle and her subsequent meandering through the dark corridors by candlelight is exceedingly spooky, and similarly the locations used for Transylvania’s barren landscapes…” The Grim Cellar

” …gives Naschy the chance to ham it up as two classic monsters for the price of one. Whether growling into the camera or wielding a mean cane, he’s great fun to behold and keeps the film lively through some of the slower spots. Taylor has surprisingly little to do […] but the clash between gothic and groovy environments more than makes up for it.” Nathaniel Thompson, Mondo Digital

“The first half feels exactly like a normal Daninsky-movie – mountain road, attack, castle, lynch-mob, macho-Naschy – but it because extra fun when he flees from there and ends up in party party party-London. The disco scene is way to short, but the whole storyline of Dr Jekyll trying to cure Daninsky from the werewolf-syndrome is fun and creative.” Ninja Dixon

“The set-pieces when Naschy transforms into werewolf or Mr Hyde is wonderfully staged, the best one being in a stuck elevator together with a scared shitless nurse…and of course the famous disco-scene, which still is very cool.” Fred Anderson, Schmollywood Babylon

“His first onscreen wolf transformation is pure unadulterated Shatner but his portrayal of Mr Hyde is worth the price of admission alone. See Hyde complete with full original vintage costume hit the streets of swinging 70’s London, cruising the strip bars and grooving clubs for wenches to play with in his own devilish way – simply brilliant and lots of fun!” Sex Gore Mutant

“Although deliriously implausible (and merely an excuse for Naschy to do double duty acting – once again), this middling Eurohorror benefits from Klimovsky’s always reliable direction and a few nice touches, such as Waldemar’s cool transformation scene in a trapped elevator.” The Terror Trap

“The decent amount of gore (head crushing, throat ripping, severed head) and a lax running time help make Dr. Jekyll and the Werewolf better than the usual Naschy mishmash. The thing that really makes the movie though is the transformation scenes […] And this one has plenty of them.” Mitch Lovell, The Video Vacuum

Choice dialogue:

Sandra: “Good and evil. The eternal make-up of all human beings. And which we can change with a chemical formula. It’s fascinating.”

Cast and characters:

  • Jacinto Molina [as Paul Naschy] … Waldemar Daninsky / Wolfman / Mr. Hyde
  • Shirley Corrigan … Justine – The Crimes of the Black Cat; Devil’s Nightmare
  • Jack Taylor … Dr. Henry Jekyll – Wax; PiecesFemale Vampire; The Night of the Sorcerers; Count Dracula; et al
  • Mirta Miller … Sandra – EyeballVengeance of the Zombies; Count Dracula’s Great Love
  • José Marco … Imre Kosta – Horror ExpressKnife of Ice; Fury of the Wolfman; The Horrible Sexy Vampire
  • Luis Induni … Otvos – The Werewolf and the Yeti; ExorcismThe Devil’s PossessedThe Loreley’s GraspThe Horrible Sexy Vampire; et al
  • Barta Barri … Gyogyo, the innkeeper – Horror Express; The Horrible Sexy Vampire
  • Luis Gaspar … Thurko, Otvos’s thug
  • Elsa Zabala … Uswika Bathory
  • Lucy Tiller … Prostitute

Technical credits:

Filmed in 70mm

Release:

The film was released in Spain on 6 May 1972.

Image credits: Cool Ass Cinema

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Doctor Jekyll and the Wolfman – Spain, 1971

‘Spine chilling horror!!’

Doctor Jekyll and the Wolfman is a 1971 Spanish directed by León Klimovsky (The Vampires’ Night Orgy; Vengeance of the Zombies; The Dracula Saga; et al) from a screenplay by Jacinto Molina (aka Paul Naschy). The latter stars, alongside Shirley Corrigan, Jack Taylor and Marta Miller.

Newlyweds Imre (Jose Marco) and Justine (Shirley Corrigan) are visiting Transylvania for their honeymoon when they are attacked by bandits. Imre is killed but Justine is rescued by Polish nobleman Waldemar Daninsky (Paul Naschy), who is also a werewolf. The local villagers launch an attack on Daninsky’s castle, so he and Justine flee to London.

Besotted with Daninsky, yet aware of his tragic lycanthropic condition, Justine asks her friend Dr. Henry Jekyll (Jack Taylor) if he can help. Jekyll injects Daninsky with his grandfather’s potion to try and cure him…

Reviews: 

“Some of the action scenes seem slow and a bit sloppy, but the plethora of horror elements and gore (Daninsky even pulls chunks of flesh out of one victim) override the shortcomings […] Dr. Jekyll and the Wolfman (1972) is well worth your investment; and for Naschy fans, this tour de force of werewolfery and Hyde’s hedonistic sadist is a howlingly good time.” Brian Bankston, Cool Ass Cinema

“Klimovsky treats the rather campy premise with considerable style, with the action moving from the traditional horror movie motifs of the old country (the angry villagers, local superstitions, freakish looking scavengers) to modern London where the scenic images include a rather seedy early 1970s Soho district. Naschy acts and looks as great as ever as the werewolf, but his Mr. Hyde, well he’s a pisser.” George R. Reis, DVD Drive-In

“Naschy is having so much fun and projects such infectious enthusiasm that it is simply impossible to be overly critical of his endeavours here. And Naschy is actually very effective in parts, particularly when he transforms into the heinous Mr Hyde. And, as the werewolf, he pulls off a good crowd scene in a groovy night-club…” Lee Brougton, DVD Savant

” …there are moments of acknowledgeable proficiency as displayed periodically by director Klimovsky in other films: the awakening of Justine in the centuries old castle and her subsequent meandering through the dark corridors by candlelight is exceedingly spooky, and similarly the locations used for Transylvania’s barren landscapes…” The Grim Cellar

” …gives Naschy the chance to ham it up as two classic monsters for the price of one. Whether growling into the camera or wielding a mean cane, he’s great fun to behold and keeps the film lively through some of the slower spots. Taylor has surprisingly little to do […] but the clash between gothic and groovy environments more than makes up for it.” Nathaniel Thompson, Mondo Digital

“The first half feels exactly like a normal Daninsky-movie – mountain road, attack, castle, lynch-mob, macho-Naschy – but it because extra fun when he flees from there and ends up in party party party-London. The disco scene is way to short, but the whole storyline of Dr Jekyll trying to cure Daninsky from the werewolf-syndrome is fun and creative.” Ninja Dixon

“The set-pieces when Naschy transforms into werewolf or Mr Hyde is wonderfully staged, the best one being in a stuck elevator together with a scared shitless nurse…and of course the famous disco-scene, which still is very cool.” Fred Anderson, Schmollywood Babylon

“His first onscreen wolf transformation is pure unadulterated Shatner but his portrayal of Mr Hyde is worth the price of admission alone. See Hyde complete with full original vintage costume hit the streets of swinging 70’s London, cruising the strip bars and grooving clubs for wenches to play with in his own devilish way – simply brilliant and lots of fun!” Sex Gore Mutant

“Although deliriously implausible (and merely an excuse for Naschy to do double duty acting – once again), this middling Eurohorror benefits from Klimovsky’s always reliable direction and a few nice touches, such as Waldemar’s cool transformation scene in a trapped elevator.” The Terror Trap

“The decent amount of gore (head crushing, throat ripping, severed head) and a lax running time help make Dr. Jekyll and the Werewolf better than the usual Naschy mishmash. The thing that really makes the movie though is the transformation scenes […] And this one has plenty of them.” Mitch Lovell, The Video Vacuum

Choice dialogue:

Sandra: “Good and evil. The eternal make-up of all human beings. And which we can change with a chemical formula. It’s fascinating.”

Cast and characters:

  • Jacinto Molina [as Paul Naschy] … Waldemar Daninsky / Wolfman / Mr. Hyde
  • Shirley Corrigan … Justine
  • Jack Taylor … Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Mirta Miller … Sandra
  • José Marco … Imre Kosta
  • Luis Induni … Otvos
  • Barta Barri … Gyogyo, the innkeeper
  • Luis Gaspar … Thurko, Otvos’s thug
  • Elsa Zabala … Uswika Bathory
  • Lucy Tiller … Prostitute

Release:

The film was released in Spain on 6 May 1972.

Image credits: Cool Ass Cinema

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