Invite DRACULA PRINCE OF DARKNESS into Your Home for Christmas

There are certain cinematic horror villains who have become nearly inseparable from the actors who portrayed them. Robert Englund is Freddy Krueger; Brad Dourif is Chucky; Kane Hodder is Victor Crowley. While several actors have given amazing turns as Bram Stoker’s OG vampire Dracula, arguably no one did it better than Christopher Lee in several films produced during Hammer Horror’s heyday.

Fans of the undead bloodsucker formerly known as Vlad the Impaler will want to invite Lee’s distinguished Count into their homes when Scream Factory releases Dracula Prince of Darkness on Blu-ray/DVD reissue on December 18th. Here’s the scoop from today’s press release (including a pre-order link) followed by the reissue’s special features, along with the synopsis and trailer at the bottom of the article.

“Christopher Lee’s second outing as the eponymous Dracula pushes the cinematic boundaries of graphic gore and terror in this 1966 Hammer Films classic. Available as a Collector’s Edition Blu-ray December 18th from Scream Factory, this ghoulish tale from Hammer’s golden era includes both the UK and US version of the film and a new 4K scan of the US version of the interoceptive from the 20th Century Fox vaults, as well as brand-new bonus features including a new audio commentary with author Troy Howarth, a new audio commentary with filmmaker Constantine Nasr and writer/producer Steve Haberman, and much more! Fans can pre-order their copies now by visiting ShoutFactory.com

Dracula Prince of Darkness Bonus Features

  • Two Versions! The UK version and the U.S. version
  • NEW 4K scan of US version of the interpositive from the 20thCentury Fox vaults
  • NEW audio commentary with author Troy Howarth
  • NEW audio commentary with filmmaker Constantine Nasr and writer/producer Steve Haberman
  • Audio commentary with cast members Christopher Lee, Suzan Farmer, Francis Matthews, Barbara Shelley
  • World of Hammer episode “Dracula and the Undead”
  • Back to Black – The Making of Dracula -Prince of Darkness
  • Super 8mm Behind-the-Scenes footage
  • Theatrical Trailers
  • Still Gallery

Synopsis:
Four English tourists find themselves stranded in the mysterious village of Karlsbad, a sinister and remote place with a deadly, dark legend. Their journey leads them to an abandoned castle where a nightmarish destiny awaits them: an evil in need of resurrection, a blood-craving beast known only as Count Dracula, Prince of Darkness (Christopher Lee, The Lord Of The Rings films, Wicker Man).  

Are you a fan of Christopher Lee’s Count Dracula? Are you excited to bring home Dracula Prince of Darkness from Scream Factory in December? Sound off in the comments below or on Facebook, Twitter, and/or Instagram!

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Scream Factory’s ‘Dracula: Prince of Darkness’ Blu-ray Will Include Two Versions and a New 4K Scan

Originally announced at Comic Con earlier this year, Scream Factory is bringing the Christopher Lee-starring Dracula: Prince of Darkness to Collector’s Edition Blu-ray, and full release details have been announced today. For starters, the Blu-ray will include two different versions of the film, US and UK, and the US version features a new 4K scan.

The full bonus features package includes:

  • Two Versions! The UK version and the U.S. version
  • NEW 4K scan of US version of the interpositive from the 20th Century Fox vaults
  • NEW audio commentary with author Troy Howarth
  • NEW audio commentary with filmmaker Constantine Nasr and writer/producer Steve Haberman
  • Audio commentary with cast members Christopher Lee, Suzan Farmer, Francis Matthews, Barbara Shelley
  • World of Hammer episode “Dracula and the Undead”
  • Back to Black – The Making of Dracula -Prince of Darkness
  • Super 8mm Behind-the-Scenes footage
  • Theatrical Trailers
  • Still Gallery

The Legendary Christopher Lee’s second outing as the eponymous Dracula pushes the cinematic boundaries of graphic gore and terror in this 1966 Hammer Films classic.

“Four English tourists find themselves stranded in the mysterious village of Karlsbad, a sinister and remote place with a deadly, dark legend. Their journey leads them to an abandoned castle where a nightmarish destiny awaits them: an evil in need of resurrection, a blood-craving beast known only as Count Dracula, Prince of Darkness (Christopher Lee).”

Official street date is December 18th.

Elizabeth Harvest – Disturbing Tale of Gothic Menace Available December 4th, 2018 from Scream Factory!

“Stylish … unafraid of sex and violence in ways that reminded me more of those ‘70s/’80s auteurs than the ones working today.” – RogerEbert.com Elizabeth […]

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Scream Factory Details Upcoming Blu-ray Release of John Carpenter’s ‘Starman’

One of the upcoming Blu-ray titles Scream Factory announced at SDCC earlier this year was John Carpenter’s 1984 sci-fi film Starman, and we’ve got full release details for ya today.

Scream announced, “John Carpenter’s extraterrestrial classic receives a long-overdue upgrade and today we reveal the final list of extras that will be on our upcoming Blu-ray release.”

Special features will include:

  • NEW They Came from Hollywood: Re-visiting STARMAN – Featuring Director John Carpenter, Actors Jeff Bridges and Charles Martin Smith, and Script Supervisor Sandy King-Carpenter
  • Audio Commentary with Director John Carpenter and Jeff Bridges
  • Vintage Featurette
  • Teaser Trailer
  • Theatrical Trailer
  • TV Spots

Planned street date at this time is December 18, 2018.

‘Texas Chainsaw Massacre: Next Gen’ Collector’s Edition Blu-Ray Arriving December 11 from Scream Factory

SCREAM FACTORY PRESENTS TEXAS CHAINSAW MASSACRE: THE NEXT GENERATION (COLLECTOR’S EDITION) BLU-RAY™ ARRIVING DECEMBER 11, 2018 “Leatherface crosses Divine with Hannibal Lecter.”  – The New York Post […]

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VALENTINE Breaks Hearts on Blu-ray via Scream Factory This February

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Scream Factory has just announced that they will be bringing director Jamie Blanks’ (Urban Legend) slasher flick Valentine to Collector’s Edition Blu-ray this February.

This is being planned as a Collector’s Edition that will come with a slipcover in its first three months of release. The fantastic new key art (to the right) is from artist Devon Whitehead (Trick r Treat, Sleepwalkers). Extras and specs are in progress and will be announced at a later date.

Valentine breaks hearts on Collector’s Edition Blu-ray via Scream Factory on February 12th. Pre-order links will be going up throughout next month.

Synopsis:

Love is in the air. On the most romantic day of the year, would-be lovers woo hearts with flowers, candy, cards and gifts. Best friends Kate (Marley Shelton), Paige (Denise Richards), Dorothy (Jessica Capshaw), Lily, and Shelly (Katherine Heigl) are young women looking for a relationship — a valentine to die for. And this year they might just get their wish.

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CREEPSHOW Blu-ray Review – Romero’s Anthology Is Still King And This Release Is A Golden Crown

Starring Tom Atkins, Leslie Nielsen, Ted Danson, Hal Holbrook, Adrienne Barbeau

Directed by George A. Romero

Distributed by Scream Factory


The melding of two creative geniuses does not always bear delicious fruit, but when those two masterminds are director George A. Romero and author Stephen King – and an unbridled passion for all things horror generates that meld – magic did indeed happen. Sharing a love of EC Comics’ horror tales and subsequent anthology films, Tales from the Crypt (1972) and The Vault of Horror (1973), King and Romero set about to create a wholly unique horror experience – one that set the bar for horror anthology films (to which only Trick ‘r Treat (2007) has come close). The ensuing film, Creepshow (1982), is the cinema equivalent to lightning in a bottle. Romero and King, who wrote the screenplay, were two of the film’s four essential players – the others being FX legend Tom Savini and director of photography Michael Gornick. Together, these four produced one of the few comic book-inspired films that looks like a comic come to life. Colors! Panels! The lighting, color palette, splashy FX work, and caricature acting all combine to make Creepshow one of horror’s most distinct and enduring films.

We all know these stories inside and out, right? Tom Atkins plays a tough father in the wraparound, cursing his son, Billy (Joe King; yes, Stephen’s son), for reading “horror crap”. “Father’s Day” introduces viewers to the Grantham clan, their penchant for drinking and dopey dancing, and Bedelia (Viveca Lindfors), who arrives late to lay flowers at the grave of her father (Jon Lormer), whom she murdered years ago. But this year daddy wants out of the grave for a piece of his Father’s Day cake. In “The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill”, our eponymous lead, played by Stephen King, finds a meteorite on his property and collects it, hoping to score a big cash payout. Instead, he finds his property and himself overcome by fast-growing foliage spawned from ooze leaking from his find. “Something to Tide You Over” sees Leslie Nielsen in a gallows humor role as Richard, a jilted husband who plays a nasty game with his wife, Becky (Gaylen Ross), and her lover, Harry (Ted Danson), only to have the tide turn (sure, pun intended) when the two reunite to give Richard a dose of his own medicine.

My personal favorite segment is “The Crate”, wherein two university professors – Henry (Hal Holbrook) and Dexter (Fritz Weaver) – are alerted to a mysterious crate tucked beneath the basement stairs. Inside, a ravenous creature lurks, waiting to rip the flesh from any unlucky person nearby. Dexter sees the creature as an abomination, while Henry sees an opportunity to finally rid himself of his obnoxious drunk of a wife, Wilma (Adrienne Barbeau). Finally, “They’re Creeping Up on You” presents Upson Pratt (E.G. Marshall), a rude and reclusive New York businessman who is obsessed with cleanliness and ridding his immaculate apartment of germs and bugs. While rolling blackouts leave most of the city in the dark, Pratt spends his night fastidiously eradicating a new horde of cockroaches infesting his place, though he soon learns when you see one cockroach it means there are countless more within the walls. The picture then wraps up the wraparound segment, to the dismay of militant parents everywhere.

This is a film I can watch over and over and never tire of seeing. Adapting comic books to the screen is one thing, but to give your viewers the sense they are living the comic, that’s a feat rarely achieved. Through bold lighting, color gels, Savini’s over-the-top cartoony FX work, transitions that mimic the panels of a comic book, and small digestible stories Romero weaves a colorful tapestry that exists somewhere between film and print. There are several shots that could have been ripped from an EC Comic splash page. Actors play up the necessary bravado required to emulate their comic book personas, too. Nielsen, in particular, has a grand time chewing every bit of scenery he can swallow. Humor and horror come in equal waves – and unlike many of those hybrid pictures both work well together here. And every story wraps up things with a twist, delivering minor bits of morality to go with the mayhem and murder.

A score can sometimes make or break a film and I would be remiss not to mention composer John Harrison’s incredible soundtrack. Harrison pulled double duty as both 1st A.D. and composer – not an impossible task, but both tough jobs. His cues perfectly complement each segment, delivering an audible experience in sync with the on-screen action. The music takes viewers on a journey, telling a story just as distinctly as the action on screen. Harrison only composed a handful of film soundtracks, all for Romero, and it’s a shame he never branched out further because his work is always a highlight of its respective films. I play his Creepshow and Day of the Dead (1985) scores on a regular basis.

After languishing with subpar home video releases for… ever, really, Scream Factory finally gives this cult classic the prestigious treatment it deserves. This release includes stunning A/V quality and more bonus features than fans could ever have asked for… but in order to have the complete package you’ll still need to pick up Synapse’s Blu-ray of Just Desserts: The Making of Creepshow (2007). While this release does share some bonus features with that edition, it is understandable why Scream Factory wasn’t able to include that mammoth documentary on their release. Even without it, fans will agree this is the release we’ve all been waiting for.

I wish Scream Factory would go back to the original camera negative (OCN) more often for their releases because the results of the new 1.85:1 1080p image, culled from a new 4K scan of the OCN supervised by D.P. Michael Gornick, are astoundingly good. It was like watching the film for the first time with clarity so sharp it’s like watching the movie unfold through a window. Details in skin and cloth and patterns and textures – all given new life thanks to the exquisite definition presented here. I was blown away from the opening frames and the picture never dulled from that moment on. The only possible complaint I could make is film grain is awfully heavy during the animated sequences, but that is to be expected given how they were photographed so it really isn’t a valid complaint at all. This is undoubtedly the best Creepshow has ever looked – only a true 4K release could top this image.

Having already raved about the score, I can only say the English DTS-HD Master Audio tracks are provided in both 2.0 and 5.1 and either option provides plenty of bang for the buck. Harrison’s score gets the most breathing room out of the surround soundtrack and would be my choice for listeners. The original mix was done in Dolby Stereo, but the multi-channel isn’t such an abomination that fans won’t want to add in some extra channels for greater immersion. Dialogue is a touch on the low side, though everything is consistently clean and easy to understand. Subtitles are available in English SDH.

There are a whopping FOUR audio commentary tracks included here, some new and some not, featuring: Director George A. Romero and Special Make-Up Effects Creator Tom Savini; Composer/First Assistant Director John Harrison and Construction Coordinator Ed Fountain; Director of Photography Michael Gornick; and an Audio Interviews Commentary, with Director of Photography Michael Gornick, Actor John Amplas, Property Master Bruce Alan Miller, and Make-Up Effects Assistant Darryl Ferrucci.

Terror and the Three Rivers is a new roundtable interview with John Amplas, Tom Atkins, Tom Savini, and Marty Schiff, all of whom discuss the making of “Creepshow” and Romero’s local work.

The Comic Book Look is a new interview with Costume Designer Barbara Anderson, covering how she was able to dress the cast to look like comic characters.

Ripped from the Pages is a new interview with Animator Rick Catizone, who did all of the animation seen in the film.

The Colors of Creepshow is a new interview with Director of Photography Michael Gornick, discussing the film’s striking cinematography and bold use of colors.

Into the Mix is a new interview with Sound Re-Recordist Chris Jenkins.

Mondo Macabre is a chat with a couple of the guys who work with/for Mondo, creating specialty posters for “Creepshow” among other films.

Collecting Creepshow is an interview with superfan Dave Burian, who owns many props made for the film.

Tom Savini’s Behind-the-Scenes Footage focuses mainly on the film’s FX work, as seen on set during filming.

Another hilarious and informative episode of “Horror’s Hallowed Grounds” is included here, featuring the locations of “Creepshow” as they look today.

A number of deleted scenes are available, each with a brief text explanation of where they fit and why they were cut.

Two trailers, one American and one Portuguese, are included along with a TV spot and two radio spots. .

There are several still galleries included for Posters & Lobby Cards, Movie Posters, Color Stills, Special FX Makeup, and Behind the Scenes.

The attractive package also includes a rarity for Scream Factory – a thick, perfect-bound booklet with an essay by Michael Gingold and dozens of production photos. The booklet and disc case are housed within a sturdy, slick chipboard slipcase.

Special Features:

  • NEW 4K scan of the original camera negative – Color correction supervised and approved by director of photography Michael Gornick
  • Audio Commentary with Director George A. Romero and Special Make-Up Effects Creator Tom Savini
  • NEW Audio Commentary with director of photography Michael Gornick
  • NEW Audio Commentary with composer/first assistant director John Harrison and construction coordinator Ed Fountain
  • NEW Terror and the Three Rivers – a round table discussion on the making of Creepshow with John Amplas, Tom Atkins, Tom Savini and Marty Schiff
  • NEW The Comic Book Look – an interview with costume designer Barbara Anderson
  • NEW Ripped From The Pages – an interview with animator Rick Catizone
  • NEW The Colors of Creepshow – a look at the restoration of Creepshow with director of photography Michael Gornick
  • NEW Into The Mix – an interview with sound re-recordist Chris Jenkins
  • NEW Mondo Macabre – A look at Mondo’s various Creepshow posters with Mondo Co-Founder Rob Jones and Mondo Gallery events planner Josh Curry
  • NEW Collecting Creepshow – a look at some of the original props and collectibles from the film with collector Dave Burian
  • Audio Interviews with director of photography Michael Gornick, actor John Amplas, property master Bruce Alan Miller, and make-up effects assistant Darryl Ferrucci
  • Tom Savini’s Behind-the-Scenes Footage
  • Horror’s Hallowed Grounds – a look at the original film locations hosted by Sean Clark
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Theatrical Trailers
  • TV Spot
  • Radio Spots
  • Still Galleries – Posters, Lobby Cards and Movie Stills
  • Still Galleries – Behind the Scenes photos

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HOUSE ON HAUNTED HILL Blu-ray Review – Visit A Place Truly Horrific: The ’90s

Starring Geoffrey Rush, Famke Janssen, Taye Diggs, Ali Larter, Peter Gallagher

Directed by William Malone

Distributed by Scream Factory


There was a sense of promise that came about when mega-producer Joel Silver and director Robert Zemeckis, along with producer Gilbert Adler, formed Dark Castle Entertainment. The production company planned to focus on remakes of William Castle pictures – this in a time before “remake” was such a vilified term. Let’s also not forget that many of Castle’s pictures were famous more for their showmanship and gimmicks than their quality and content… with the exception of the first film Dark Castle chose to remake, House on Haunted Hill (1959). A classic of both the haunted house subgenre and lead actor Vincent Price, this new take on an old story added a few interesting new elements to the tale, though by the end the story pretty much fizzles out. I remember having a blast with this movie and really enjoying it, but my last viewing was probably 15 years ago. Time hasn’t been too kind, and while the first act is still plenty of fun it’s all downhill from there.

1931. A patient uprising at Vannacutt Institute for the Criminally Insane leaves Dr. Vannacutt (Jeffrey Combs) and his staff brutally murdered, while a fire starts within and eventually engulfs the massive building and everyone inside. Cut to present day, where Stephen Price (Geoffrey Rush) is being interviewed by a local news team about his latest endeavor, a gimmick-based rollercoaster. Price is known for his showmanship and bravado. The only person who doesn’t buy his bullshit is Evelyn (Famke Janssen), his loveless wife. Evelyn has instructed Stephen to put together a guest list for her upcoming birthday party, to be held in the remains of the Vannacutt Institute. Price drafts up a list… but then his computer mysteriously erases it and replaces the names with five seemingly random selections.

Later, those same five guests arrive at the institute and meet both Stephen and Evelyn, though everyone is still unsure why they were chosen to attend. Price pays this little mind and lays out the ground rules for the night’s festivities: anyone who can survive an entire night in the mansion leaves $1 million richer. Any who leave forfeit their check and it, too, goes to the winner(s). Not long after Price gives his speech the house goes on lock-down, sealing all the windows and doors with steel plates. Unbeknownst to those in attendance, Price has strategically rigged the house to scare the wits out of anyone who explores it. He isn’t going to make surviving till morning easy. Unbeknownst to Price, however, is the fact the ghosts of Vannacutt Institute are still in residence and their bloodlust has not been sated since that fateful night in 1931.

The setup here is great, just as it was in the original. Director William Malone wisely turned Stephen Price into an amalgamation of Vincent Price (just check out that stache) and William Castle, using the former’s appearance and the latter’s flair for theatrics. This allows the film to have plenty of fun – which it does. The opening with Price being interviewed is a highlight, and might even be the best scene in the picture. I still enjoy the Mouseketeer roll call of who’s who once everyone lands in the mansion, though the events get shaky from there because the movie just wastes some key setups, like the ghost of Dr. Vannacutt, the ghost inhabiting the mansion, why these specific people were chosen, etc. Characters take us around the mansion to explore creepy chambers and burned-out rooms, but it’s all in an effort to elicit a few extra scares. Not necessarily a bad thing, but the ending should have brought about a sense of resolution and not just one of “oh, cool, so they managed to get away…”

Speaking of “they”, I had forgotten this movie plays like a who’s who of whose career didn’t make it out of the ‘90s. With the exception of Janssen and Rush, I can’t recall seeing a single one of these faces past the late ‘90s; maybe Ali Larter. That isn’t to say these actors aren’t good in their roles. Taye Diggs is a great straight man, coming at every problem with a level head and a sense of calm. Bridgette Wilson excels at playing women who are just annoying enough that once they get some sort of comeuppance you think “yea, that’s about right”. Peter Gallagher does smarmy douchebag so well it’s almost too natural. And then there’s Chris Kattan. Where did that guy go? He’s probably miscast here but his energy is infectious enough and he doesn’t overstay his welcome.

The best casting in the film, outside of Rush, who completely carries the picture every step of the way, is Jeffrey Combs as Dr. Vannacutt. Unfortunately, his role is small and he doesn’t do much past the opening, but he apparently returns for Return to House on Haunted Hill (2007) which I have not seen but reviews seem to be extremely unfavorable. Dark Castle pumped out a couple more decent remakes – Thirteen Ghosts (2001) and House of Wax (2005) – but nothing that could be considered an outright classic or hit. The company has moved away from horror in the past decade, focusing on action and drama.

Horror films from the ‘90s tend to look a bit flat and soft, but the 1.85:1 1080p image is ultra clean and stunningly detailed. The production design of the mansion is richly layered, with many subtleties and ornate patterns. This HD image allows for every minute detail to be seen with strong clarity. Outside of a few soft shots, the picture is sharp, offering up lifelike qualities in the image. Colors are rich and solid contrast keeps blacks looking inky and deep.

Sound design is crucial to haunted house films and the English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 surround soundtrack capably delivers an immersive experience. The beginning of the picture features minimal use of rear channels, with dialogue and most effects directed to the front. Once the house begins to come alive, so do the corners of the room, creaking with decayed floors and old doors, oohing with ghostly emanations, and exploding when the moment strikes. Bass response is average, with some decent rumbling. Subtitles are available in English.

The disc includes a legacy audio commentary with director William Malone.

New features on this Scream Factory disc include Interview with Director William Malone, Interview with Composer Don Davis, and Interview with Visual Effects Supervisor Robert Skotak.

A trio of still galleries is included: Concept Art and Storyboard Gallery, Behind-the-Scenes Visual FX Gallery, and Movie Stills and Poster Gallery.

A Tale of Two Houses and Behind the Visual FX are both vintage featurettes that have been carried over from the DVD.

A reel of deleted scenes, the theatrical trailer, and two TV spots are also included.

Special Features:

  • NEW 2K scan from the original film elements
  • NEW interview with director William Malone
  • NEW interview with composer Don Davis
  • NEW Interview with visual effects supervisor Robert Skotak
  • Never-Before-Seen storyboards, concept art and behind-the-scenes photos courtesy of visual effects producer Paul Taglianetti
  • Audio Commentary with director William Malone
  • A Tale of Two Houses – vintage featurette
  • Behind the Visual FX – vintage featurette
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Theatrical Trailer
  • TV Spots
  • Movie Stills and Poster Gallery

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THE BRIDE Blu-ray Review – Even Sexy Androgynous Sting Can’t Make this Watchable

Starring Sting, Jennifer Beals, Clancy Brown, David Rappaport

Directed by Franc Roddam

Distributed by Scream Factory


The Bride (1985) isn’t really a horror flick. It’s pretty much a straight drama/romance. Which is to say, despite this being about Frankenstein’s monster and his bride, there’s nothing remotely scary about the film. Also, there’s just a small amount of gore. However, it must be said that it does feature a Dr. Frankenstein played by a sexy androgynous Sting, so it’s got that going for it.

The movie opens basically at the end of the Bride of Frankenstein (1935). The bride, later called Eva (Jennifer Beals), is brought to life in Frankenstein’s laboratory. She freaks out. Frankenstein’s monster doesn’t take her rejection very well and flips out. Chaos ensues. The monster, who goes by the rather confusing name of Viktor (Clancy Brown), scuffles with Frankenstein and eventually flees the castle. From here the narrative splits for most of the remaining running time. Frankenstein spends the movie trying to bed his creation (isn’t he sort of her father? Ewww…), while Viktor meets a dwarf circus performer named Rinaldo (David Rappaport) and the pair take to the road. Does the monster become a circus performer? You bet he does! Hoo boy, how exciting, eh?

So, you might be asking, “Why would sexy androgynous Sting want to bed a monster? Couldn’t he do a lot better?” Well, Eva might be a corpse raised from the dead, but she has nary a scratch on her. Wouldn’t want to scuff Jennifer Beals, would we? Since Viktor is scarred and identifiably a monster, it really makes you wonder: were there several women before Eva, or did he only need one try? Since the difference between Viktor’s appearance and Eva’s is so stark, I can only conclude that there is a pile of dead women in various stages of deformity buried somewhere on the Frankenstein property.

But enough weird fanboy speculation. While The Bride isn’t boring, it sure as hell is a whole lot of average. Franc Roddam’s directing is quite stilted, and he cares far more about the costumes and scenery than the script or acting. Lloyd Fonvielle’s story is more than serviceable and could have made a decent movie had it been directed with any energy. But the film is at such an emotional distance from its characters that it comes off as quite disinterested. Which is bad in two ways: Frankenstein’s monster isn’t a smart guy, so every defining personality trait is based on his emotions. Also, Sting is supposed to be filled with a fiery passion for Eva. We kind of need some emotion there, too.

One of the few things that makes the film worth watching is David Rappaport’s performance. He plays Rinaldo, the dwarf circus performer and only friend to Viktor. He has an enthusiasm that the rest of the performers don’t. No surprise, then, that he’s at the center of one of the most touching scenes in the film. Actually, there is one more thing: Sting makes a great “man you love to hate.” This might be more surprising to some than others. It did not surprise me.

The emphasis on the visual makes The Bride a very pretty movie to look at. Stephen H. Burum’s cinematography is occasionally gorgeous, especially when he’s working with light that breaks up darkness. But, of course, none of this matters if the narrative isn’t engaging.

If you’re a fan of this film, the Scream Factory special edition released last month has you covered. The special features include a two-part interview with Clancy Brown. Each segment is about twenty minutes. Brown is a charming guy, and I very much liked what he had to say about the movie. Hell, I enjoyed listening to him more than the movie itself.

There’s also a thirty-minute interview with Franc Roddam, who is very honest about the movie’s flaws. He seems to recall every detail of the film’s production thirty years later. His commentary track is equally detailed. If you have any questions about the production, they will

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