Dark Moon Rising – USA, 2015

‘Pray for the sunrise’

Dark Moon Rising is a 2015 American supernatural horror feature film written and directed by Justin Price (Alien: Reign of ManThe 13th FridayThe ElfForsaken). The Pikchure Zero Entertainment production stars Anastasia Antonia, Eric Roberts, Khu and Billy Blanks.

Plot:

A group of shape-shifting werewolves appear in a small town in search of a mysterious girl who is re-born once every 2000 years. In order to save their kind from the brink of extinction, they must capture her before she becomes a fully-fledged Lycan and reclaim her place as the Alpha species.

Unknown to them, however, lurks yet another of her kind secretly living in the same small town. If they can capture both, then they would have the power to control a new species of werewolves and enslave the human race…

Reviews:

“There was way too much background noise and music that made the lines/dialog hard to hear. The acting is atrocious, the screenplay is a disaster zone, editing is terrible, werewolves were a dreadful mess, shots did not transition well, terrible music, horrendous CGI, and cheesy everything.” Florita A., Hell Horror

“It maintains a steady hold on those watching but can definitely loosen the grip a little to pave way for some quippy one-liners and covers all the bases of a werewolf franchise in the making. A good, solid story with quintessential special effects that add finishing touches to an otherwise pretty good movie. ” The Movie Sleuth

” …fatally, for all its everything-but-the-kitchen-sink approach, Dark Moon Rising forgoes that vital quality that made all those classic werewolf films before it so memorable; namely, the human heart that beats beneath the bloody pelt of the beast. Not quite beware the moon, but Dark Moon Rising nonetheless stops just short of being something to truly howl about.” Benjamin Poole, The Movie Waffler

“Many of the character interactions are nonsense. Most of the time, it feels like the characters are reading from different scripts as more than half of the things they say to each other don’t seem related. The actors also have a bad habit of mumbling their lines, making the dialogue hard to hear. Complicating this problem is poor sound editing. Many times, the dialogue is drowned out by music or background noises.” Rachel Willis, Screen Relish

Buy DVD: Amazon.co.uk

” …it features rather odd jumps in time, leaves out important passages, leaves things half-explained and also changes between its characters’ fantasy and their reality without warning. Oddly enough then, all of this hardly spoils the movie’s enjoyability, as the whole thing is very well structured and paced, features cool set-pieces aplenty, and is carried by interesting (and well-played) characters.” Mike Haberfelner, Search My Trash

“The film is rife with terrible CGI effects used for everything from fire, to blood, to x-ray vision (don’t ask- I can’t explain it). In fact the film opens with a CGI tanker truck on (CGI) fire followed by a CGI werewolf. The werewolves inexplicably all have super powers. One of them named Gecko (no I’m not kidding) has a poison breath attack…” Che Gilson, UK Horror Scene

Cast and characters:

  • Anastasia Antonia … Dawn [as Stasi Esper]
  • Eric Roberts … Henrick
  • Khu … Kaio
  • Billy Blanks … Sheriff Tom
  • Justin Price … Sin
  • Cameron White … Chace
  • Lisa May … Feighn
  • Matthew Simmons … Gecko
  • Timea Saghy … Danse
  • Jared Allman … James
  • Emily Bedford … Lisa (voice)
  • Deanna Grace Congo … Amy
  • Michele Gourdine … Lisa
  • Sasha Higgins … Dominique
  • Katie Lee Mayo … College Student [as Katie Mayo]

Release:

In the US, released on digital and DVD on August 4, 2015, by Uncork’d Entertainment.

Trivia:

Not to be confused with the 2009 werewolf movie of the same name.

HORRORPEDIA is wholly independent and we rely solely on the very minor income generated by affiliate links and internet ads to stay online. Please support us by not blocking ads on our site. Thank you.

Quick links to contents:

A | B | C | D | E  | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

The post Dark Moon Rising – USA, 2015 appeared first on HORRORPEDIA.

Among the Shadows – USA, 2018

‘Where the werewolves roam’

Among the Shadows is a 2018 American supernatural horror feature film featuring werewolves directed by Tiago Mesquita (co-producer of The Monkey’s Paw) from a screenplay by Mark Morgan. The movie stars Lindsay Lohan, Charlotte Beckett, Gianni Capaldi and Dominik Madani.

Plot:

Kristy Wolfe (Charlotte Beckett) is a Brussels private eye descended from werewolves who must go to work when her uncle Harry Goldtsone is murdered in a politically-motivated attack. Patricia Sherman (Lindsay Lohan), the wife of European Federation President Richard Sherman, hires Wolfe to investigate Goldstone’s killing, as he was her husband’s campaign manager.

Wolfe finds bodies falling all over city and must use her innate instincts to unravel the case and stay alive long enough unmask the conspiracy…

Cast and characters:

  • Lindsay Lohan … Patricia Sherman – Scary Movie 5; Side Effects
  • Charlotte Beckett … Kristy Wolfe – Penny Dreadful TV series
  • Gianni Capaldi … Lieutenant McGregor
  • Dominik Madani … Colin Haroosen
  • Reynald Bialès … Frederik
  • Barry Jay Minoff … Matthew
  • Kristoffel Verdonck … Richard Sherman
  • John Flanders … Uncle Harry
  • Peter Organ … Lycan
  • Daniel Hugh Kelly … Bittencourt
  • Jean-Michel Vovk … Max Eddelman
  • Olivier Englebert … Bastien
  • Bond Mgebrishvili … Mason
  • Gaelle Gillis … Nina
  • Sulaiman Rochemont … Louis

Filming locations:

Brussels and AED Studios, Lint, Flanders, Belgium

Working title:

The Shadow Within

HORRORPEDIA is wholly independent and we rely solely on the very minor income generated by affiliate links and internet ads to stay online. Please support us by not blocking ads on our site. Thank you.

Quick links to contents:

A | B | C | D | E  | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

The post Among the Shadows – USA, 2018 appeared first on HORRORPEDIA.

The Return of the Vampire – USA, 1943

ReturnOfTheVampire1944_preview

‘Man? or Monster? or Both?’

The Return of the Vampire is a 1943 supernatural horror feature film directed by Lew Landers (Terrified; The Boogie Man Will Get You; The Raven) from a screenplay by Griffin Jay (Cry of the Werewolf; The Mummy’s Hand; et al), based on an idea by Kurt Neumann (The Fly). The Sam White produced movie stars Bela Lugosi, Frieda Inescort, Nina Foch and Miles Mander.

Although not a sequel to Lugosi’s 1931 Dracula, this film has been interpreted by some critics and some scholars as an unofficial follow-up with Lugosi’s character renamed because the production was made at Columbia Pictures rather than Universal.

return of the vampire 1944 werewolf

The Return of the Vampire is being released on Blu-ray by Scream Factory on February 19, 2019. Extra features are in progress and will be announced nearer the date.

Plot:

A voiceover (Miles Mander) announces that ‘the following events are taken from the notes of Professor Walter Saunders of King’s College, Oxford…’

A mist-shrouded cemetery at night: A werewolf (Matt Willis) enters a tomb and tells his vampire ‘Master’ that it is time for him to awake. A hand reaches out of the coffin and lifts the lid. A shadow appears on the wall, and the unmistakable voice of Bela Lugosi asks what happened while he was asleep. The werewolf replies that his latest victim has been taken to Dr. Ainsley’s clinic.

return_of_vampire_still

Baffled by her patient’s anaemic condition, Lady Jane Ainsley (Frieda Inescort) has called in Professor Walter Saunders (Gilbert Emery). While they are discussing the patient, two children enter. They are Lady Jane’s son, John, and Professor Saunders’ granddaughter, Nikki. Lady Jane and the professor send the children to bed and return to their patient.

The vampire, finding that his victim is not alone, attacks Nikki instead. After the patient dies, Professor Saunders sits up the rest of the night, reading a book on vampires written two hundred years ago by Armand Tesla…

bela lugosi return of the vampire dvdjpg

Buy DVD: Amazon.co.ukAmazon.com

Reviews:

“The film is efficiently directed by Lew Landers, complete with the dreamlike rovings of a mobile camera and moody, mist-shrouded set pieces that are second to none. It also benefits greatly from the unwonted topicality of its setting.” Jonathan Rigby, American Gothic

“The best thing about it, apart from the outstanding performances by Inescourt (as a distaff Van Helsing) and Foch (making her debut as the vampire’s chief victim), is the ending in which the werewolf, tired of being in thrall to the vampire, drags him into the sun as he sleeps. The last shot of Lugosi’s face melting (actually a wax mould over a skeleton) was cut by the censor in Britain.” The Aurum Film Encyclopedia: Horror

1143972207_f

“Bela Lugosi’s Armand Tesla is a far cry from the smooth and well-mannered Count Dracula, who smarmed his way into society. In his final serious outing as a vampire, Lugosi gives us a grouchy and bad-tempered bloodsucker, exhibiting little of the charisma traditionally associated with the role.” And You Call Yourself a Scientist!

” …contains everything that makes classic horror films so special. It’s brimming with atmosphere in the form of foggy graveyards and decaying crypts, with Lugosi’s vampiric presence being the highlight of the show. As the speech-gifted werewolf, Matt Willis (who in human form resembles a bloated Buster Crabbe) is fun to watch and is given much screen time…” George R. Reis, DVD Drive-In

8x10_return_of_the_vampire_BA00121_L_2

“It almost ODs on atmosphere (that low-lying ground fog is everywhere, including indoors at times) and the surprises are few, but there is plenty of energy and fun in the proceedings, with even the comic relief being sharper than usual. Though I wouldn’t call it a great movie, it is a lot of fun…” Dave Sindelar, Fantastic Movie Musings and Ramblings

“As a film, it certainly coasts a bit on the novelty of seeing Lugosi back in the cape, but, in hindsight, it sort of sadly encapsulates how stagnated his career had become. Once a huge star, here he is clutching to past glories in a film content to do faintly echo the better films that preceded it. The Return of the Vampire is certainly not a bad film, merely one that feels a bit perfunctory in many ways.” Brett Gallman, Oh, the Horror!

“Lady Jane Ainsley is an atypically strong female character for horror movies of the time, which makes this more interesting than it might be otherwise, and Inescort does a fine job with the role, offering it both strength and charisma. She’s basically the lead protagonist in the picture…” Ian Jane, Rock! Shock! Pop!

“Lugosi proved he still had it when portraying this kind of Eastern European supernatural threat, and if he wasn’t onscreen quite as much as you might have liked, he did get star billing and made his scenes, er, count. With creeping fog and graveyards featuring prominently, it was cliché all the way as far as the visuals went, but had a nice line in high-falutin’ dialogue well delivered by a solid cast.” Graeme Clark, The Spinning Image

81EOoKDe+7L._SL1500_

Buy DVD: Amazon.co.ukAmazon.com

“Inescort’s got good scenes with both Gilbert Emery and Miles Mander and Nina Foch seems like she’s a better actor than her part. The direction’s actually half good, usually going bad after a really good shot, but it’s probably better direction than most of the Universal monster movies of the era.” The Stop Button

…crude but fun – if you can accept cornball premises and a corny fog swirling around the vampire as he attacks his victims.” John Stanley, Creature Features

“The revenge orientated plot is too humdrum to give anyone a chance, apart from the conceit of a werewolf servant for Lugosi.” Alan Frank, The Horror Film Handbook

Cast and characters:

  • Bela Lugosi … Armand Tesla / Dr. Hugo Bruckner
  • Frieda Inescort … Lady Jane Ainsley – The Alligator People
  • Nina Foch … Nicki Saunders – Jennifer; Cry of the Werewolf
  • Roland Varno … John Ainsley
  • Miles Mander … Sir Frederick Fleet
  • Matt Willis … Andreas Obry
  • Ottola Nesmith … Elsa Walter – Governess
  • Gilbert Emery … Dr. Walter Saunders
  • Leslie Denison … Detective Lynch
  • William Austin … Detective Gannett
  • Jeanne Bates … Miss Norcutt (uncredited)
  • Billy Bevan … Horace – Civil Defence Worker (uncredited)
  • Sydney Chatton … Peters – Desk Clerk (uncredited)
  • Sherlee Collier … Nicki as a child (uncredited)
  • Frank Dawson … Old Man (uncredited)
  • Harold De Becker … Horace’s Friend – Civil Defence worker #2 (uncredited)
  • Donald Dewar … John as a Child (uncredited)
  • Jean Fenwick … Girl on Street (uncredited)
  • Olaf Hytten … Ben – Lady Jane’s Butler (uncredited)
  • Nelson Leigh … Sir Frederick’s Office Assistant (uncredited)
  • Stanley Logan … Col. Mosley (uncredited)
  • Audrey Manners … Nurse (uncredited)
  • George McKay … Cemetery Caretaker (uncredited)
  • Marianne Mosner … Nurse (uncredited)
  • Clara Reid … Old Woman (uncredited)

Budget:

$75,000

Return-of-the-Vampire-1943

the-return-of-the-vampire-nina-foch-everett

return_of_vampire_1944_poster_01

return_vampire return-vampire-1944-foreign-poster--large-msg-11373591998-2

HORRORPEDIA is truly independent and we rely solely on the very minor income generated by affiliate links and internet ads to stay online. Please support us by not blocking ads on our site. Thank you.

Quick links to contents:

A | B | C | D | E  | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

The post The Return of the Vampire – USA, 1943 appeared first on HORRORPEDIA.

Five Reasons Why “Teen Wolf” (1985) is Totally Tubular!

Wicked Horror is the author of Five Reasons Why “Teen Wolf” (1985) is Totally Tubular!. Wicked Horror is the internet’s only horror fan site for free original horror movies, news, review & more.

Family friendly horror comedies are generally hit and miss — and the glut of ho-hum and just plain crappy sub-sub-genre offerings from the 1980s proves it. Wicked Stepmother, Haunted Honeymoon, My Best Friend Is A Vampire, My Mom’s A Werewolf… seriously, you don’t want me to keep going.

But every now and then during the Reagan and New Coke years we’d get a halfway decent horror movie that was (generally) acceptable for junior high viewing — The Monster Squad, Gremlins, Killer Klowns from Outer Space. You know the usual suspects. But standing head, paw and basketball shorts above ‘em all, of course, is 1985’s Teen Wolf, a movie that may very well be the closest any movie has gotten to condensing everything great about the 1980s into one motion picture.

To be fair, the concept for Teen Wolf isn’t terribly original. In fact, one might go as far as to say the movie is nothing more than a blatant rip-off of Full Moon High, a movie that came out four years earlier about a high school football player who comes down with a bad case of lycanthropy. Alas, that movie was pretty dreadful, making Teen Wolf one of those rare “wannabe” movies that actually outclasses its source inspiration in every way.

There are a lot of things that make Teen Wolf such an entertaining horror offshoot. Obviously, Michael J. Fox’s performance as Scott Howard gives the movie a lot of appeal it probably wouldn’t otherwise have had with someone else in the lead. By and large the werewolf special effects, themselves, are definitely a lot better than those in more “legitimate” horror flicks from the decade. Perhaps the most intriguing/endearing thing about the movie — and the thing that’s kept it a cult classic for the last 32 years — is the fact that it’s basically a formula coming-of-age high school movie that doesn’t let its absurd plot twist keep it from abandoning its tried-and-true, non-horror-centric premise. Ultimately, this is a movie that has more in common with Porky’s than An American Werewolf in London. I think that makes it a more holistically engaging and entertaining movie than if the filmmakers went with a more traditional, violence-laden genre take on the story.

Related: A Look at the History of these Lycanthrope Creatures in Film!

As I was saying earlier, there are a lot of things that make Teen Wolf such a fun little throwback, and today I’d like to put an emphasis on five specific elements of the flick that I believe make it one of the most enduring horror comedies of the decade. So what are you waiting for? Comb back your sweet mullet, sock on your dandiest Day-Glo tank top and get ready to rock out with your fangs out … it’s long past time we gave this Me-First Decade masterpiece the retroactive reverence it rightly deserves. Oh, and for some added fun, I’ll even throw in a few Teen Wolf Trivia Tidbits in-between entries, because who DOESN’T need more random stuff culled from IMDB in their lives?

A scene from "Teen Wolf" (1985)

Michael J. Fox, seen here grooving on Teen Wolf’s awesome soundtrack (probably).

THE MUSIC!

The soundtrack of this movie is just pure synth jock jam awesomeness from start to finish. Pretty much every song in the movie feels like it could fit into a training montage in a Rocky movie, from James House’s pulse-quickening “Flesh on Fire” to Dee Palmer’s heart-rendering “Silhouette” to Mark Safan’s adrenaline-dumper “Win In The End.” Teen Wolf is filled to the brim with tunes that’ll make you want to bang your fists in the air and do … uh, whatever people back then used to do, I guess? If you can’t find at least one song in this movie to add to your workout mix, you might as well give up on music altogether. You won’t find too many movies with a soundtrack this authentically retro, this authentically diverse and this authentically awesome from the 1980s (or any other decade, for that matter.)

Teen Wolf Trivia Tidbit No. 1: Film composer Miles Goodman had hundreds of film and TV credits to his name before his  death in 1996. Among other movies, he served as the primary composer for La Bamba, Problem Child, What About Bob? and The Muppet Christmas Carol — he was even nominated for a Golden Globe for his work on 1986’s Little Shop Of Horrors.

A scene from "Teen Wolf" (1985)

Oh, the 1980s … when underage drinking wasn’t just acceptable, it was practically encouraged!

 

THE PARTY SCENES!

The party scenes are usually a highlight in most any 1980s movie, regardless of genre (Sixteen Candles, Weird Science, Back To School, Elm Street 2 … need I keep going?). Thankfully, Teen Wolf is no exception, as it features some of the most boisterous hootenanny sequences of the decade. I mean, this is a movie where a fat dude motorboats Jello off a classmate’s yabbos AND a teenage werewolf bites a beer can and drinks it sideways — you mean to tell me you wouldn’t mind missing a soiree like that when you were in high school? (Oh, and before you answer, here are three little words that might sway your opinion: Whipped. Cream. Bikinis.)

Teen Wolf Trivia Tidbit No. 2: Apparently, director Rod Daniel was hellbent on making the party scenes as realistic as possible — in fact, legend has it that he even went to Nebraska (the movie’s canonical setting) to interview miscellaneous teenagers about their beer-bashing behavior and used it as inspiration for the flick’s raucous kegger sequences.

A scene from "Teen Wolf" (1985)

Kids, don’t try this at home – instead, try it at your friend’s house!

THE VAN SURFING SCENE!

In hindsight, there’s a lot of things that occur in Teen Wolf that us, as a more modern, enlightened audience, might find a bit concerning. You know, like all of the casual homophobia in the dialogue, or the fact that at least 50 percent of the movie concerns teens in pursuit of and/or directly engaged in underage drinking. And, of course, there’s the part where Michael J. Fox literally CLAWS his date during a closet tryst — you can determine the unfortunate implications of THAT scene for yourself. Then, there’s this totally awesome — and totally idiotic — scene where the titular Teen Wolf air guitars to The Beach Boys while riding his best friend’s van like a three ton surfboard and does, like, seventeen backflips in slow motion. Granted, this is all happening at, like, 10 miles per hour in a residential subdivision. Considering how impressionable us kids of the ‘80s were, I am just SHOCKED this didn’t lead to at least one or two Jackass or Beavis and Butt-Head copycat lawsuits.

Teen Wolf Trivia Tidbit No. 3: No, that wasn’t Michael J. Fox himself personally surfing atop the van during the scene. Believe it or not, the person behind the wolf makeup in the sequence wasn’t even a stunt actor — it was all the handiwork of co-star Jerry Levine (who played best bud Stiles) and a couple of strategically placed cables allowing him to do all those flashy handstands and splits.

A scene from "Teen Wolf" (1985)

Forget the dude from “Hoosiers,” there’s never been a better cinematic basketball coach than this dude right here.

COACH FINSTOCK!

Jay Tarses doesn’t just steal the movie as Fox’s basketball mentor, Coach Finstock. He practically runs away with it, pawns it for half-value, breaks back into the shop after closing, steals it back and resells it to the original owner at double the original price. Virtually every line of dialogue Finstock has in the movie is pure gold. These range from his rant about the IRS to his less than inspirational “inspiring” story he tells the team about a third stringer to his attempts to get the other team’s coach to forfeit the game as a means of beating the traffic. Of course, this brings us to his most iconic line of dialogue, which in a way, also represents some of the sagest wisdom ever presented in the celluloid medium:

There are three rules that I live by: never get less than 12 hours sleep, never play cards with a guy who has the same first name as a city and never get involved with a woman with a tattoo of a dagger on her body. Now you stick to that, and everything else is cream cheese.”

Take heed, schlubs like Quentin Tarantino and Joss Whedon. Now THAT is how you script quality dialogue.

Teen Wolf Trivia Tidbit No. 4: Speaking of dialogue, Teen Wolf was co-written by Matthew Weisman and Jeph Loeb. If the latter sounds familiar, that’s because he’s since gone on to become one of the most famous comic book writers in the world, working on such acclaimed series as Batman: The Long Halloween and Superman For All Seasons. He’s also had some experiences in TV, too, having served as a writer for Lost and the co-executive producer of Heroes.

A scene from "Teen Wolf" (1985)

Well, there’s at least one “beaver shot” in “Teen Wolf” I can publish …

THE INFAMOUS BIT PLAYER “EXPOSURE” SCANDAL!

In a movie with so many memorable elements — the scene where Teen Wolf’s dad shows up in full werewolf makeup for the first time, all of Stiles’ hilariously raunchy T-shirts, the fact that the main love interest in the movie is named “Boof,” etc. — perhaps the most famous thing in the movie is … well, literally somebody’s thing. Next to the infamous “ghost kid” scene in Three Men and a Little Baby, there probably isn’t a more freeze-framed moment in Blockbuster history than the parting shots of Teen Wolf, where for all the rubles in Russia it looks like some mischievous extra in the stands TOTALLY yanked their Donger out. For those of you that aren’t too keen on putting NSFW inquiries into the Google search bar, the long-running rumor is that towards the very end of the movie you can briefly spot an extra in the audience seemingly exposing himself. Apparently, the urban legend is popular enough that it was featured on both a VH1 special and an episode of Family GuyAlthough, even now the video evidence is inconclusive as to whether that’s really a wiener making a cameo appearance … indeed, some YouTubers offer visual evidence the extra in question is actually a female, thus adding pop culture conspiracy theory atop pop culture conspiracy theory. Regardless, the urban legend has only added to Teen Wolf’s legacy over the years — like a cherry atop an already great sundae, except in this case, the cherry may or may not constitute a form of felonious public indecency.

Also See: Eight Horror Movies That Were Somehow Turned Into Children’s Cartoons!

Teen Wolf Trivia Tidbit No. 5: Yes, we all know that Teen Wolf was resurrected as an MTV drama, but did you know that the original Wolf not only inspired a REALLY bad sequel sans Fox (Teen Wolf Too) but even a short-lived animated series? Well, consider yourself formally enlightened now.

The post Five Reasons Why “Teen Wolf” (1985) is Totally Tubular! appeared first on Wicked Horror.

Final Girls Ep 101: Halloween Grab Bag IV – ‘Pumpkinhead’ & ‘The Howling’

Welcome back for the 101st episode of Final Girls Horrorcast! For their special October series this year The Girls will cover some films that go along with traditional Halloween costumes.

The post Final Girls Ep 101: Halloween Grab Bag IV – ‘Pumpkinhead’ & ‘The Howling’ appeared first on Modern Horrors.

[Trailer] ‘Bonehill Road’ is Finally Unleashed onto DVD

I feel like we’ve been following Todd Sheets’ werewolf movie Bonehill Road for years, just waiting in anticipation for the carnage to be unleashed, and now the time has come. The beast is unchained and let loose as we speak onto DVD, with a digital release arriving soon. And thanks to Bloody-Disgusting, we have a […]

The post [Trailer] ‘Bonehill Road’ is Finally Unleashed onto DVD appeared first on HorrorMovies.ca.

Lindsay Lohan is a Vampire in New Poster + Trailer for AMONG THE SHADOWS

It’s been a minute since we’ve heard any news about Lindsay Lohan’s upcoming werewolf flick Among the Shadows (formerly titled The Shadow Within). Having been shot a few years ago, the film’s release has been held up for quite some time.

But while we all wait with burning anticipation to see whether Lohan will reprise her role in Life-Size 2 (!!!) – we can feast on a new poster and trailer for her return to the big screen!

Among the Shadows follows Kristy Wolfe (Charlotte Beckett, All the Money in the World), a private investigator attempting to unravel the mystery of her uncle’s murder. But Wolfe has a secret — as her name would suggest, she descends from a long line of werewolves.

Lohan plays Patricia Sherman, the wife of European Federation President Richard Sherman. Patricia enlists Wolfe’s help to protect her husband against attack from the detective’s clan. But as it turns out, Lohan is a vampire! As the trailer suggests, the film revolves around the battle of competing creatures against a political backdrop.

Lower-budget fare? Yep! Probably a bit schlocky? Well, hopefully! But the visuals are decent – and we could always use more Lohan on the screen! That’s just a fact we’re all going to have to contend with ~ Public mishaps aside, she’s never really given a bad performance – and she looks and sounds decent here! Let’s give it a shot.

We recently spoke with Scottish actor and genre vet Gianni Capaldi (Nightworld), who plays a detective alongside Beckett. While our full interview has yet to go up, we can share that he doesn’t feel the star power will overbear the film — and likewise, he isn’t worried about the public’s reaction. “Lindsay as a vampire is a must-see for all her fans. It will attract publicity so that’s always a plus. Vampires, werewolves, and a Scottish detective… What more do you want from a genre film?”

The film also stars Dominik Madani, Olivier Englebert, Reynald Biales, and David Hugh Kelly. As of right now, Among the Shadows does not have a concrete release date – but it is assumed the film will be released within the coming months.

The post Lindsay Lohan is a Vampire in New Poster + Trailer for AMONG THE SHADOWS appeared first on Dread Central.

Doctor Jekyll and the Werewolf – Spain, 1971

‘Spine chilling horror!!’

Doctor Jekyll and the Wolfman is a 1971 Spanish directed by León Klimovsky (The Vampires’ Night Orgy; Vengeance of the Zombies; The Dracula Saga; et al) from a screenplay by Jacinto Molina (aka Paul Naschy). The latter stars, alongside Shirley Corrigan, Jack Taylor and Mirta Miller.

Newlyweds Imre (Jose Marco) and Justine (Shirley Corrigan) are visiting Transylvania for their honeymoon when they are attacked by bandits. Imre is killed but Justine is rescued by Polish nobleman Waldemar Daninsky (Paul Naschy), who is also a werewolf. The local villagers launch an attack on Daninsky’s castle, so he and Justine flee to London.

Besotted with Daninsky, yet aware of his tragic lycanthropic condition, Justine asks her friend Dr. Henry Jekyll (Jack Taylor) if he can help. Jekyll injects Daninsky with his grandfather’s potion to try and cure him…

Reviews: 

“Some of the action scenes seem slow and a bit sloppy, but the plethora of horror elements and gore (Daninsky even pulls chunks of flesh out of one victim) override the shortcomings […] Dr. Jekyll and the Wolfman (1972) is well worth your investment; and for Naschy fans, this tour de force of werewolfery and Hyde’s hedonistic sadist is a howlingly good time.” Brian Bankston, Cool Ass Cinema

“Klimovsky treats the rather campy premise with considerable style, with the action moving from the traditional horror movie motifs of the old country (the angry villagers, local superstitions, freakish looking scavengers) to modern London where the scenic images include a rather seedy early 1970s Soho district. Naschy acts and looks as great as ever as the werewolf, but his Mr. Hyde, well he’s a pisser.” George R. Reis, DVD Drive-In

“Naschy is having so much fun and projects such infectious enthusiasm that it is simply impossible to be overly critical of his endeavours here. And Naschy is actually very effective in parts, particularly when he transforms into the heinous Mr Hyde. And, as the werewolf, he pulls off a good crowd scene in a groovy night-club…” Lee Brougton, DVD Savant

” …there are moments of acknowledgeable proficiency as displayed periodically by director Klimovsky in other films: the awakening of Justine in the centuries old castle and her subsequent meandering through the dark corridors by candlelight is exceedingly spooky, and similarly the locations used for Transylvania’s barren landscapes…” The Grim Cellar

” …gives Naschy the chance to ham it up as two classic monsters for the price of one. Whether growling into the camera or wielding a mean cane, he’s great fun to behold and keeps the film lively through some of the slower spots. Taylor has surprisingly little to do […] but the clash between gothic and groovy environments more than makes up for it.” Nathaniel Thompson, Mondo Digital

“The first half feels exactly like a normal Daninsky-movie – mountain road, attack, castle, lynch-mob, macho-Naschy – but it because extra fun when he flees from there and ends up in party party party-London. The disco scene is way to short, but the whole storyline of Dr Jekyll trying to cure Daninsky from the werewolf-syndrome is fun and creative.” Ninja Dixon

“The set-pieces when Naschy transforms into werewolf or Mr Hyde is wonderfully staged, the best one being in a stuck elevator together with a scared shitless nurse…and of course the famous disco-scene, which still is very cool.” Fred Anderson, Schmollywood Babylon

“His first onscreen wolf transformation is pure unadulterated Shatner but his portrayal of Mr Hyde is worth the price of admission alone. See Hyde complete with full original vintage costume hit the streets of swinging 70’s London, cruising the strip bars and grooving clubs for wenches to play with in his own devilish way – simply brilliant and lots of fun!” Sex Gore Mutant

“Although deliriously implausible (and merely an excuse for Naschy to do double duty acting – once again), this middling Eurohorror benefits from Klimovsky’s always reliable direction and a few nice touches, such as Waldemar’s cool transformation scene in a trapped elevator.” The Terror Trap

“The decent amount of gore (head crushing, throat ripping, severed head) and a lax running time help make Dr. Jekyll and the Werewolf better than the usual Naschy mishmash. The thing that really makes the movie though is the transformation scenes […] And this one has plenty of them.” Mitch Lovell, The Video Vacuum

Choice dialogue:

Sandra: “Good and evil. The eternal make-up of all human beings. And which we can change with a chemical formula. It’s fascinating.”

Cast and characters:

  • Jacinto Molina [as Paul Naschy] … Waldemar Daninsky / Wolfman / Mr. Hyde
  • Shirley Corrigan … Justine – The Crimes of the Black Cat; Devil’s Nightmare
  • Jack Taylor … Dr. Henry Jekyll – Wax; PiecesFemale Vampire; The Night of the Sorcerers; Count Dracula; et al
  • Mirta Miller … Sandra – EyeballVengeance of the Zombies; Count Dracula’s Great Love
  • José Marco … Imre Kosta – Horror ExpressKnife of Ice; Fury of the Wolfman; The Horrible Sexy Vampire
  • Luis Induni … Otvos – The Werewolf and the Yeti; ExorcismThe Devil’s PossessedThe Loreley’s GraspThe Horrible Sexy Vampire; et al
  • Barta Barri … Gyogyo, the innkeeper – Horror Express; The Horrible Sexy Vampire
  • Luis Gaspar … Thurko, Otvos’s thug
  • Elsa Zabala … Uswika Bathory
  • Lucy Tiller … Prostitute

Technical credits:

Filmed in 70mm

Release:

The film was released in Spain on 6 May 1972.

Image credits: Cool Ass Cinema

Quick links to HORRORPEDIA contents:

A | B | C | D | E  | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

The post Doctor Jekyll and the Werewolf – Spain, 1971 appeared first on HORRORPEDIA.

Doctor Jekyll and the Wolfman – Spain, 1971

‘Spine chilling horror!!’

Doctor Jekyll and the Wolfman is a 1971 Spanish directed by León Klimovsky (The Vampires’ Night Orgy; Vengeance of the Zombies; The Dracula Saga; et al) from a screenplay by Jacinto Molina (aka Paul Naschy). The latter stars, alongside Shirley Corrigan, Jack Taylor and Marta Miller.

Newlyweds Imre (Jose Marco) and Justine (Shirley Corrigan) are visiting Transylvania for their honeymoon when they are attacked by bandits. Imre is killed but Justine is rescued by Polish nobleman Waldemar Daninsky (Paul Naschy), who is also a werewolf. The local villagers launch an attack on Daninsky’s castle, so he and Justine flee to London.

Besotted with Daninsky, yet aware of his tragic lycanthropic condition, Justine asks her friend Dr. Henry Jekyll (Jack Taylor) if he can help. Jekyll injects Daninsky with his grandfather’s potion to try and cure him…

Reviews: 

“Some of the action scenes seem slow and a bit sloppy, but the plethora of horror elements and gore (Daninsky even pulls chunks of flesh out of one victim) override the shortcomings […] Dr. Jekyll and the Wolfman (1972) is well worth your investment; and for Naschy fans, this tour de force of werewolfery and Hyde’s hedonistic sadist is a howlingly good time.” Brian Bankston, Cool Ass Cinema

“Klimovsky treats the rather campy premise with considerable style, with the action moving from the traditional horror movie motifs of the old country (the angry villagers, local superstitions, freakish looking scavengers) to modern London where the scenic images include a rather seedy early 1970s Soho district. Naschy acts and looks as great as ever as the werewolf, but his Mr. Hyde, well he’s a pisser.” George R. Reis, DVD Drive-In

“Naschy is having so much fun and projects such infectious enthusiasm that it is simply impossible to be overly critical of his endeavours here. And Naschy is actually very effective in parts, particularly when he transforms into the heinous Mr Hyde. And, as the werewolf, he pulls off a good crowd scene in a groovy night-club…” Lee Brougton, DVD Savant

” …there are moments of acknowledgeable proficiency as displayed periodically by director Klimovsky in other films: the awakening of Justine in the centuries old castle and her subsequent meandering through the dark corridors by candlelight is exceedingly spooky, and similarly the locations used for Transylvania’s barren landscapes…” The Grim Cellar

” …gives Naschy the chance to ham it up as two classic monsters for the price of one. Whether growling into the camera or wielding a mean cane, he’s great fun to behold and keeps the film lively through some of the slower spots. Taylor has surprisingly little to do […] but the clash between gothic and groovy environments more than makes up for it.” Nathaniel Thompson, Mondo Digital

“The first half feels exactly like a normal Daninsky-movie – mountain road, attack, castle, lynch-mob, macho-Naschy – but it because extra fun when he flees from there and ends up in party party party-London. The disco scene is way to short, but the whole storyline of Dr Jekyll trying to cure Daninsky from the werewolf-syndrome is fun and creative.” Ninja Dixon

“The set-pieces when Naschy transforms into werewolf or Mr Hyde is wonderfully staged, the best one being in a stuck elevator together with a scared shitless nurse…and of course the famous disco-scene, which still is very cool.” Fred Anderson, Schmollywood Babylon

“His first onscreen wolf transformation is pure unadulterated Shatner but his portrayal of Mr Hyde is worth the price of admission alone. See Hyde complete with full original vintage costume hit the streets of swinging 70’s London, cruising the strip bars and grooving clubs for wenches to play with in his own devilish way – simply brilliant and lots of fun!” Sex Gore Mutant

“Although deliriously implausible (and merely an excuse for Naschy to do double duty acting – once again), this middling Eurohorror benefits from Klimovsky’s always reliable direction and a few nice touches, such as Waldemar’s cool transformation scene in a trapped elevator.” The Terror Trap

“The decent amount of gore (head crushing, throat ripping, severed head) and a lax running time help make Dr. Jekyll and the Werewolf better than the usual Naschy mishmash. The thing that really makes the movie though is the transformation scenes […] And this one has plenty of them.” Mitch Lovell, The Video Vacuum

Choice dialogue:

Sandra: “Good and evil. The eternal make-up of all human beings. And which we can change with a chemical formula. It’s fascinating.”

Cast and characters:

  • Jacinto Molina [as Paul Naschy] … Waldemar Daninsky / Wolfman / Mr. Hyde
  • Shirley Corrigan … Justine
  • Jack Taylor … Dr. Henry Jekyll
  • Mirta Miller … Sandra
  • José Marco … Imre Kosta
  • Luis Induni … Otvos
  • Barta Barri … Gyogyo, the innkeeper
  • Luis Gaspar … Thurko, Otvos’s thug
  • Elsa Zabala … Uswika Bathory
  • Lucy Tiller … Prostitute

Release:

The film was released in Spain on 6 May 1972.

Image credits: Cool Ass Cinema

Quick links to HORRORPEDIA contents:

A | B | C | D | E  | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

The post Doctor Jekyll and the Wolfman – Spain, 1971 appeared first on HORRORPEDIA.

Overtime – Australia, 2016

‘Working late is a killer!’

Overtime is a 2016 Australian comedy horror short film directed by Craig D. Foster from a screenplay co-written with Emma McKenna. The Metro Screen production stars Aaron Glenane, Ainslie Clouston, Arka Das and Adam Dunn.

Office worker Ralph (Aaron Glenane) is trying to avoid working late as the impending full moon will cause him to transform into a werewolf

After many successful festival screenings, Overtime is now available to view online via Vimeo.

Cast and characters:

  • Aaron Glenane … Ralph
  • Ainslie Clouston … Megan
  • Arka Das … Sean
  • Adam Dunn … Simon

More werewolves

Quick links to the contents of HORRORPEDIA:

A | B | C | D | E  | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

The post Overtime – Australia, 2016 appeared first on HORRORPEDIA.